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Summer Session Resources

Spring term required all of us to be a little more compassionate, empathetic, flexible, and resilient. Clearly, moving into emergency remote instruction has been taxing and required a good deal of individual effort and teamwork. But along the way  we all have developed a number of new skills to enhance the talents and expertise we already possessed.  In her book, The Power of Passion and Perserverance, (2016), Angela Duckworth reveals that successful people in all walks of life do not have exceptional IQs. Rather, they display true GRIT.  She argues that after years of reserch, she found that ;

                   TALENT + EFFORT = SKILL

                                and that

                    SKILL + EFFORT = ACHIEVEMENT

Effort has been found to play an even bigger role in one's development of skill and overall achievement than any inherent talent. This finding compliments Carloe Dweck's work on Growth Mindset, noting that those who.....

With Summer Session A right on the heels of spring term, there is little time to be intentional in developing an "online" course. As Remote Instruction continues over summer, the good new is many excellent resources have been developed in the last two months to help faculty work through the pedagogical processes and become familiar with the instructional tools needed to move course content online. Below is an intentionally curated set of the best information, links and tools we have found to assist you in preparing your summer course.

Considerations for the Planning and Re-design of Your Course

Think about your learning outcomes and how you currently address these through in-class exercises or learning experiences. Keep these goals in mind as you think about how content will be presented; how you will check for/assess student understanding and uncover misconceptions or misunderstandings; how will you design group work for students to do collaborative activities or projects; and finally, how will you assess mastery of the course content.

Components to Creating a Successful Learning Experience

Best Practices for Teaching Online

      

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This infographic displays the vital components to create a successful online teaching experience. View the full graphic or download it here.

Some other items to consider as you "re-design" your course include:

  • What is Blended and Online Learning? Blended and online courses not only change how content is delivered, they also redefine traditional educational roles and provide different opportunities for learning.
  • Reducing Cognitive Load: We have known for some time that high levels of stress can wreak havoc on our overall health. COVID-19 and the ensuing changes in one's personal life have certainly heightened levels of stress and anxiety for many in our community. For first-generation and/or underrepresented minority college students, moving into emergency remote instruction (ERI) is an unfamiliar academic environment that may activate or amplify these physical and psychological reactions. The increased demands placed on students during remote learning have increased the cognitive load placed on students and pose additional risks to deep and lasting learning. Read more about strategies to reduce cognitive load for students here.
  • What is Flipping the Classroom? “flipping the classroom” means that students gain first exposure to new material outside of class, usually via reading or lecture videos, and then use class time to do the harder work of assimilating that knowledge, through problem-solving, project work, discussion, or debates.Here are resources created by Vanderbilt University which explain what it is and how it works.
  • This Exploratory study identifies the role(s) of the online instructor and categorizes critical competencies for online teaching
  • Synchronous vs. Asynchronous Content: In Remote Instruction, the design process focuses on deciding when to utilize a synchronous (everyone online at a designated time); or asynchronous(everyone works at their own speed and time) mode for learning.
    • Review your existing course content and highlight what pieces can be delivered asynchronously. Make notes on how you might deliver this piece of content asynchronously. For example, a synchronous session can be held via zoom and then recorded. The recorded session can be linked into the module or on the announcements page so students can replay it as needed.
    • Think about the questions that come up in your synchronous F2F classroom. Design your content to anticipate questions, problems, misconceptions, etc. so you can mitigate them by adding in the answers if the topic is going to be covered asynchronously.
  • Faculty Worshops on moving to Remote Instruction: CETL has created a variety of workshops to assist you in the move to remote instruction. View and sign up here.

Engagement & Assessment Strategies

Engagement Strategies

  • Student engagement in remote instruction presents us with much the same challenge as with onsite courses. Some students always share their thoughts and others remain quiet. Providing opportunities for engagement online takes thoughtful planning and preparation. Here are some useful strategies to consider here.
  • 10 Tips for Effective Online Discussions | Educause Review - Tips to help educators ensure that online discussions are engaging and beneficial for students. Explore the list here.

Assessment Strategies

  • As the continued disruption to student learning continues, the unusual circumstances present us with an opportunity to rethink how we assess student learning at the end of the term. Take some time to consider whether the following alternatives suggested here may be appropriate to your course and situation.

  • Educational research questions the assumptions that it is more prevalent or easier to cheat in online exams, read more about Online Education and Authentic Assessment here.

Digital Labs and Simulations for Science and Math

  • An online resource that generates interactive simulations. Access it here.
  • From physics to biology, and beyond, this website provides information regarding digital labs and simulations. Read it here.
  • North American Network of Science Labs Online. Access it here
  • UCLA has created a curated list of resources for migrating labs to an online format. Read it here.

Migrate Course Content to Digital Formats

Develop Course Content

In Remote Instruction, the development of content focuses on creating and pulling all of the pieces together. As each piece is developed, it should be reviewed for alignment with your course outcomes. Ask yourself: is this something that is nice to know (fun or cool facts) or need to know in order to understand the concept?.

  • Before you begin development, take time to review the many resources and instructional tools available for creating content or leveraging already existing content.
  • Determine Synchronous vs. Asynchronous Content: In Remote Instruction, the design process focuses on deciding when to utilize a synchronous (everyone online at a designated time); or asynchronous(everyone works at their own speed and time) mode for learning.
    • Review your existing course content and highlight what pieces can be delivered asynchronously. Make notes on how you might deliver this piece of content asynchronously. For example, a synchronous session can be held via zoom and then recorded. The recorded session can be linked into the module or on the announcements page so students can replay it as needed.
    • Think about the questions that come up in your synchronous F2F classroom. Design your content to anticipate questions, problems, misconceptions, etc. so you can mitigate them by adding in the answers if the topic is going to be covered asynchronously.

Engagement and Group Work Activities

Engagement Activities

Group Work Activities and Tips

  • Read our Tips for Effective Group Work Online here.
  • Doing group work with online requires some planning. We've provided a Checklist for Online Group Work here.

Creating Course Modules in CatCourses

Creating a modular format in CatCourses provides an efficient way to deliver course content and reduces cognitive load for students.

Educational Technologies

There are a variety of Educational Technologies available, and CatCourses is at the center of the teaching and learning ecosystem. 

  • CatCourses allows the use of the integrated tools which promote student success by allowing for uploading assignments, viewing course videos, taking quizzes and participating in discussion sections all in one place.

Zoom is great for delivering synchronous course sessions or recording sessions for later viewing .

  • OIT has put together a full page of information and help topics for Zoom here.
  • Just getting started with Zoom? Sign up for a Zoom workshop to learn more about the different functions for remote instruction or enhancing Zoom Security here.
  • Zoom is also integrated into CatCourses allowing for course meetings to be scheduled and linked directly in your course.
  • OIT and CETL offer workshops on using Zoom for instruction and ehnancing Zoom security. View and sign up here.

Creating Instructional Videos: Do you have lecture content that can be recorded in 5 to 7 -minute chunks? You can also add a reflective question or short quiz at the end to confirm the video was viewd and the level of comprehension.

  • Camtasia is a recording and edting tool available to all faculty. You can request a license here.
  • Faculty can sign up for a 1 hour workshop on Creating Instructional Videos here.
  • Videos can be uploaded to CatCourses through Kaltura which allows for direct interaction and viewing analytics. Sign up for consultation or Training on Kaltura here.

Faculty Resources

UC Merced Faculty Who Have Volunteered to Help Other Faculty

Many of our Faculty have experience developing everything from fully online to hybrid to flipped courses and are willing to share their knowledge and experience. Feel free to reach out to the faculty on this list or others in your department. 

  • Tanya Golash-Boza
  • Jeff Yoshimi
  • Marcos Garcia-Ojeda
  • Carrie Menke
  • Kristina Callaghan
  • Christine Isborn
  • Michell Leslie
  • Ryan Baxter
  • Michael Colvin
  • Sylvain Masclin
  • Mike Dawson
  • Kamal Dulai

Links to Additional Faculty Resources

Additional Faculty Resources

CETL also offers workshops for faculty on many aspects of moving to remote instruction. You can view and sign up here. If there is a workshop listed that doesn't fit your schedule, please email us at cetl@ucmerced.edu to arrange a 1-1 consult.